Tip #17 of 50 – Why Not Just Move Into A Hotel For Your Retirement?

As The Wesley Communities approach 50 years of excellent service, our CEO Peg Carmany offers “Peg’s Perspective” on a variety of topics affecting seniors and their adult children as they plan and choose to age well – 50 tips to celebrate 50 years!
Tip #17 of 50 –  Why not just move into a hotel for your retirement?
You may have seen the cartoons and ads and articles that suggest (some in all seriousness) that the price of retirement home living is high so, “Why not just move into a hotel?” The article then usually goes on about the price per day, and usually concludes (inaccurately) that hotel living is the better deal financially.
Let me give you many reasons why this is just a horrible idea:

  1. Hotels are not communities, because most people in hotels are there for relatively short stays, and people who are “here and gone” do not make particularly good neighbors.
  2. Hotels generally do not have good (and certainly not healthy) food options, if any.
  3. Hotels in general do not offer group or individual activities. Hotels are not in the people business. They are in the overnight accommodation business.
  4. Hotels do not provide healthcare.
  5. A hotel room. Picture it. Really?

Now, let me give you some really good reasons why retirement communities are far superior to hotels:

  1. Retirement communities are focused on the needs and wants of the people who live there.
  2. It’s never too late to make lifelong friends . . . and people who move into retirement communities are almost always, without exception, there to stay.
  3. People who live in retirement communities are interested and interesting.
  4. The food and activity options are fabulous.
  5. Healthcare is provided at all levels in continuing care retirement communities.

We invite you to visit one of The Wesley Communities to see all that they have to offer! Learn more about our services and amenities by visiting our website at www.thewesleycommunities.com
 
 


An Interview with Janet Herring : A Wesley Ridge Resident With A Truly Special Past

Recently, The Wesley Ridge Retirement Community book club read the historical fiction novel, The Atomic City Girls. The group was lucky to have the author, Janet Beard, visit to discuss the book and meet with the residents who read it.
The novel chronicles the making of the atomic bomb in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where hundreds of young women were hired to work on special tasks, which were never truly explained. The workers at Oak Ridge were instructed that they were helping to win the war, but were told to ask no questions and to reveal nothing to outsiders.
While all of our Wesley Ridge book club members were excited to meet with the author, one resident in particular, Janet Herring, had an even greater enthusiasm, she was one of the young women who worked at Oak Ridge in 1945. Click the above link to learn more about Janet and her interesting past.
 


Physical Fitness and Aging

We all want our parents to remain as active and independent as possible, and we want the same thing for ourselves! Regular exercise is pivotal for seniors. Seniors are at greater risk for disease, lost mobility, and falls than any other age group. Conversely, they often realize the positive effects of exercise more quickly than another age group. If your parent hasn’t been exercising, it can be difficult to get started.
Healthaging.net offers some tips to get over that initial hump. Click the link above to learn more.
 


When to Get On the Wait List at a Retirement Community

If you or a loved one is considering their senior living options, you likely have begun doing research on the retirement communities. Or perhaps you have a loved one in need of long-term care or memory care and staying in the home will not be safe for much longer. With all of the differing communities and facilities available (especially in larger cities), it can be a lot to take in so the decision process can take some time. This varies from one person to another because some senior living decisions are needs-based and move much quicker, while others are more preference-based and can take months or even years. Once you hone in on a few specific places that meet your criteria, you may want to consider getting your name on their waiting lists. Many facilities, particularly assisted living or nursing care facilities, are likely that they have one. Click the link above to learn more.